Nutrition: one of the hot topics of our time, and also one of the most avoided conversations. It’s hard to talk about food, and nutrition is a dense, multi-faceted topic. So we’re going to tackle this in parts. We’ll continue the conversation and break down what kinds of food to eat and why, how much, and other helpful hints and tricks we have learned over the years.

But first, baby steps.

Worldwide obesity has doubled since 1980. I won’t list a ton of data you can easily find on Google, but we’re facing an epidemic. In fact, you don’t need Google to know that. Big Food has completely reworked what we eat for a major profit, but under the guise of making life more convenient. Just take a trip down the frozen section in your grocery store. Most foods have new characteristics now: quick to prepare, but laden with preservatives and unknown ingredients, and servings the size of your face.

Before you start burning your Doritos, let’s start somewhere simple we can all improve at. The average American dines at a restaurant four to five times per week, and if you didn’t know, restaurants aren’t exactly leading the way in health and nutrition. I had a salmon salad today at one of my favorite “cheat meal” restaurants, and on the surface, it seemed relatively healthy. Then I looked up the macro breakdown.

874 calories

31g protein

39g carbs

69g fats

Great on the protein side — the only real win — and not too shabby on carbs (even though it’s a salad) but the fats? I’m all about healthy fats, and I probably eat more fats than most health-conscious folks, but 68 grams is outrageous. Not to mention the fact that 874 calories accounts for two-thirds of my daily calorie intake.

I share this to give you a snapshot of what you’re eating when dining out, even when making the “healthy” choices. You have to look at what you’re truly eating and you need to know how your body is responding to that food. We’ll talk about that in the next post.

But if we can at least get back in our own kitchens, I believe we can make some huge strides. There’s a lot of information out there; hundreds of paleo recipes, Whole30 calls-to-action, Keto chants, you know name it. Cooking real food – simple, easy recipes – can make such a big difference. And by real food, we mean meats and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, and no sugar.

As we speak, I’m eating a protein pumpkin muffin that only took ten minutes to prep. A win, if you’ve seen some of the complicated “paleo” recipes out there. Don’t be fooled. Cooking at home can be easy.

Protein Pumpkin Spice Muffins: http://www.foodiefiasco.com/high-protein-pumpkin-spice-muffins/  Note: I used coconut sugar in place of erythritol for a healthier option.

Another great place to start for easy, healthy recipes that won’t kill your budget: https://paleonickstuff.com

 

Written By: Shyla Stokes, Copyright Crossfit405